dillydallydesign

Soviet Architecture Photographer Frederic Chaubin travels around some ex-SSRs to capture the essence of what he calls Sci-Fi Architecture.
Words and pictures from here. 

Polytechnic University (Minsk, Belarus, 1981) © Frederic Chaubin
Wedding Palace (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1985) © Frederic Chaubin
“Roads Ministry” (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1975) © Frederic Chaubin
“Soviet Palace” (Kalinigrad, Russia, 1975) © Frederic Chaubin
“Druzhba Holiday Center Hall” (Yalta, Ukraine, 1984)© Frederic Chaubin

Soviet Architecture Photographer Frederic Chaubin travels around some ex-SSRs to capture the essence of what he calls Sci-Fi Architecture.

Words and pictures from here


Polytechnic University (Minsk, Belarus, 1981) © Frederic Chaubin


Wedding Palace (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1985) © Frederic Chaubin


“Roads Ministry” (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1975) © Frederic Chaubin


“Soviet Palace” (Kalinigrad, Russia, 1975) © Frederic Chaubin


“Druzhba Holiday Center Hall” (Yalta, Ukraine, 1984)© Frederic Chaubin

Comments
3 years ago | 3 notes.
Partisan Memorials in former Yugoslavia
by Robert Burghardt

The selection here dates from the latter period, which followed the emancipation from the Soviet-Union and the development of Yugoslavia’s own road to socialism along the line of “self-management”. These monuments belong to the most important witnesses of Yugoslav memorial culture and stem from the most active period of Yugoslav modern art which has been described as socialist modernism or socialist aestheticism.
As War-monuments they are unique: They do not express the fighting and death, but life, resistance and the energy by which they were carried. They are directed forward while they mark the starting point for a new society, whose products they are.
Top Photo: Kosmaj, Yougoslavia.

Kozara, Yougoslavia.

Makljen, Yougoslavia.

Sutjeska, Yougoslavia.


Petrova Gora, Yougoslavia.
Voir aussi ici.

Partisan Memorials in former Yugoslavia

by Robert Burghardt


The selection here dates from the latter period, which followed the emancipation from the Soviet-Union and the development of Yugoslavia’s own road to socialism along the line of “self-management”. These monuments belong to the most important witnesses of Yugoslav memorial culture and stem from the most active period of Yugoslav modern art which has been described as socialist modernism or socialist aestheticism.

As War-monuments they are unique: They do not express the fighting and death, but life, resistance and the energy by which they were carried. They are directed forward while they mark the starting point for a new society, whose products they are.

Top Photo: Kosmaj, Yougoslavia.



Kozara, Yougoslavia.



Makljen, Yougoslavia.



Sutjeska, Yougoslavia.



Petrova Gora, Yougoslavia.

Voir aussi ici.

Comments
3 years ago | 6 notes.