dillydallydesign

 
Head on Top
Work of german photgrapher Thorsten Schmidtkord.
All these poor speechless people. So sad.
Taken from Fubiz
 

Head on Top

Work of german photgrapher Thorsten Schmidtkord.

All these poor speechless people. So sad.

Taken from Fubiz


 
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Comments
3 years ago | 1 note.
Nov 23 2010
Comments
3 years ago
Nov 22 2010
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Comments
3 years ago | 1 note.
Icons on fire.
Got this powerful image back in mind. The shock of a burning icon. 
Tried to remember some other recent architectural disasters. 

up above and down here : Montreal Biosphere (1967), Buckminster Fuller, Fire in 1976.

—-

Mandarin Hotel Beijing (2009), Office of Metropolitan Architecture, Fire in 2009.


Villa NM in New York (2007), UN Studio, Fire in 2008.





Berlin Philarmonic Hall (1963), Hans Scharoun, Fire in 2008.


TU Delft Architecture School (1970), J.H. van der Broek + Jacob Bakema, Fire in 2008.


Pilgrim Baptist Church (1890), Louis Sullivan, Fire in 2006.

Icons on fire.

Got this powerful image back in mind. The shock of a burning icon. 

Tried to remember some other recent architectural disasters. 

up above and down here : Montreal Biosphere (1967), Buckminster Fuller, Fire in 1976.

—-

Mandarin Hotel Beijing (2009), Office of Metropolitan Architecture, Fire in 2009.


Villa NM in New York (2007), UN Studio, Fire in 2008.

Berlin Philarmonic Hall (1963), Hans Scharoun, Fire in 2008.



TU Delft Architecture School (1970), J.H. van der Broek + Jacob Bakema, Fire in 2008.



Pilgrim Baptist Church (1890), Louis Sullivan, Fire in 2006.



Comments
3 years ago | 11 notes.
Michiko Kon (今道子), photographer.
With a cycle of exhibitions called Still Lives, which feature some ambiguous inorganic objects made of dead animals, Michiko Kon redefines the representative role of ‘still life’ art, resuscitating the inanimate objects into some kind of living monsters. She portrays the shades of grey between the often too easy dualist depiction of life and death.
Can’t help but point out the Japanese influence in raw yellowtails and tunas. 
  
up above: Cuttlefish and sneaker, 1990.
—-
Work #11

Tuna fish-bones, octopus and bucket, 2002

Chicken claws and tuxedo, 1996.

Hat of yellowtails, 1986.

Octopus and Melons, 1989.

Brassiere of Gizzard Shads, 1989.
 

Sardine and Baby’s Breath, 1984.


Mackerel and chiken legs, 1990.


Self-Portrait #4, 1994.


The red boot, 1995.

Michiko Kon (今道子), photographer.

With a cycle of exhibitions called Still Lives, which feature some ambiguous inorganic objects made of dead animals, Michiko Kon redefines the representative role of ‘still life’ art, resuscitating the inanimate objects into some kind of living monsters. She portrays the shades of grey between the often too easy dualist depiction of life and death.

Can’t help but point out the Japanese influence in raw yellowtails and tunas. 

  

up above: Cuttlefish and sneaker, 1990.

—-


Work #11


Tuna fish-bones, octopus and bucket, 2002


Chicken claws and tuxedo, 1996.


Hat of yellowtails, 1986.


Octopus and Melons, 1989.


Brassiere of Gizzard Shads, 1989.


Sardine and Baby’s Breath, 1984.


Mackerel and chiken legs, 1990.


Self-Portrait #4, 1994.


The red boot, 1995.

Comments
3 years ago
Vintage Nikon Small World Competition
Old trouvailles made by microscopes. Or are they made by a vintage art generator ? Beautiful patterns, potentially a “Kid A / Amnesiac” cover runner up.
Top image: 1990 - Crystals evaporated from solution of magnesium sulfate and tartaric acid (50x), Polarized Light. / Richard H. Lee, Argonne National Laboratory.
…

1996 - Doxorubin in methanol and dimethylbenzenesulfonic acid (80x), Polarized Light. / Lars BechNaarden, The Netherlands.
1984 - Inclusions of goethite and hematite in Brazilian agate (30x), Transmitted light with reflected fiber-optic illumination. / John I. Kolvula, Gemological Institute of America.

1893 - Suctorian attached to stalk of red algae, encircled by ring of diatoms (125x), Darkfield. / Elieen Roux, Bob Hope International Heart Research Institute.

1977 - Crystals of rutile (titanium dioxide) and tridymite (a polymorph of quartz) in a cobalt-rich glass (350x), Combined oblique illumination and reflected light. / James W. Smith, Independence, Ohio.

1990 - Thin slab of Brazilian agate (12x), Technique: Brightfield. John I. Koivula, Gemological Institute of America - Santa Monica, California.
1991 - Glasses in ferrite window (33x). Technique: Darkfield. Harvard Schnerdyl, Applied Magnetics Corporation, Goleta, California.
1989 - Crystal patterns from an excitatory neurotransmitter (40x). Technique: Polarized Light. Dennis D. Kunkel, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. 
1983 - Slow melt of testosterone propionate (50x) Technique: Polarized Light. Per H. Kjeldsen, University of Michigan, School of Dentistry. Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.


1979 - Etched silicon, single crystal (100x). Technique: Incident Light with Nomarski Differential Contrast. W. William Nash Pomona, California, USA.

Vintage Nikon Small World Competition

Old trouvailles made by microscopes. Or are they made by a vintage art generator ? Beautiful patterns, potentially a “Kid A / Amnesiac” cover runner up.

Top image: 1990 - Crystals evaporated from solution of magnesium sulfate and tartaric acid (50x), Polarized Light. / Richard H. Lee, Argonne National Laboratory.


1996Doxorubin in methanol and dimethylbenzenesulfonic acid (80x), Polarized Light. / Lars BechNaarden, The Netherlands.

1984Inclusions of goethite and hematite in Brazilian agate (30x), Transmitted light with reflected fiber-optic illumination. / John I. Kolvula, Gemological Institute of America.


1893Suctorian attached to stalk of red algae, encircled by ring of diatoms (125x), Darkfield. / Elieen Roux, Bob Hope International Heart Research Institute.


1977Crystals of rutile (titanium dioxide) and tridymite (a polymorph of quartz) in a cobalt-rich glass (350x), Combined oblique illumination and reflected light. / James W. Smith, Independence, Ohio.


1990 - Thin slab of Brazilian agate (12x), Technique: Brightfield. John I. Koivula, Gemological Institute of America - Santa Monica, California.

1991 - Glasses in ferrite window (33x). Technique: Darkfield. Harvard Schnerdyl, Applied Magnetics Corporation, Goleta, California.

1989 - Crystal patterns from an excitatory neurotransmitter (40x). Technique: Polarized Light. Dennis D. Kunkel, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. 

1983 Slow melt of testosterone propionate (50x) Technique: Polarized Light. Per H. Kjeldsen, University of Michigan, School of Dentistry. Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.



1979 - Etched silicon, single crystal (100x). Technique: Incident Light with Nomarski Differential Contrast. W. William Nash Pomona, California, USA.

Comments
3 years ago | 3 notes.
2010 Nikon Small World Competition
A photomicrograph is a technical document that can be of great significance to science or industry. But a good photomicrograph is also an image whose structure, color, composition, and content is an object of beauty, open to several levels of comprehension and appreciation.

Top image: Crystallized melt of sulfur and acetanilide (10X). Technique: Transmitted Light, Crossed Polars. John Hart, Hart3D Films and Dept. Atmospheric and Oceanic Sci. Univ. Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
…


Potassium ferricyanide (40X) Technique: Polarized light. Stefan Eberhard, The University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, Athens, Georgia, USA.




Martensia sp. (red seaweed), living specimen (40X), Technique: Brightfield. John Huisman, Murdoch University School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia.




Developing Eleutherodactylus coqui (frog), whole mount (20X), Technique: Stereomicroscopy. Mike Klymkowsky, MCD Biology University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA.


Checkerboard domain of a bent core liquid crystal (40X), Technique: Brightfield. Rajdeep Deb, Assam University Department of Chemistry, Assam, India.

2010 Nikon Small World Competition

A photomicrograph is a technical document that can be of great significance to science or industry. But a good photomicrograph is also an image whose structure, color, composition, and content is an object of beauty, open to several levels of comprehension and appreciation.

Top image: Crystallized melt of sulfur and acetanilide (10X). Technique: Transmitted Light, Crossed Polars. John Hart, Hart3D Films and Dept. Atmospheric and Oceanic Sci. Univ. Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA.

Potassium ferricyanide (40X) Technique: Polarized light. Stefan Eberhard, The University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, Athens, Georgia, USA.

Martensia sp. (red seaweed), living specimen (40X), Technique: Brightfield. John Huisman, Murdoch University School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia.

Developing Eleutherodactylus coqui (frog), whole mount (20X), Technique: Stereomicroscopy. Mike Klymkowsky, MCD Biology University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA.


Checkerboard domain of a bent core liquid crystal (40X), Technique: Brightfield. Rajdeep Deb, Assam University Department of Chemistry, Assam, India.

Comments
3 years ago | 1 note.
Installations by Michael Johansson


Ghost II, 2009White objects.Dimensions: 2,9 x 2,9 m.Installation view: Galleri Arnstedt, Östra Karup (S)
.


Frusna Tillhörigheter, 2010(Frozen Belongings)Armchair, typewriter, books, boxes, clock, etc.Dimensions: 0.55 x 0.8 x 0,55 m.
.



Strövtåg i tid och rum, 2009(Strolls through time and space)Armchair, books, bags, boxes, radio, clock, etc.Dimensions: 0.55 x 0.85 x 0,6 m.
.
Found on ‘But does it float’

Installations by Michael Johansson

Ghost II, 2009
White objects.
Dimensions: 2,9 x 2,9 m.
Installation view: Galleri Arnstedt, Östra Karup (S)

.

Frusna Tillhörigheter, 2010
(Frozen Belongings)
Armchair, typewriter, books, boxes, clock, etc.
Dimensions: 0.55 x 0.8 x 0,55 m.

.


Strövtåg i tid och rum, 2009
(Strolls through time and space)
Armchair, books, bags, boxes, radio, clock, etc.
Dimensions: 0.55 x 0.85 x 0,6 m.

.

Found on ‘But does it float

Comments
3 years ago | 5 notes.

pixel it

A Poster with an alterable Structure
A poster with an alterable structure to display messages - a visually professional and attention grabbing alternative to messy blackboard writings.“Pixel It” consists of two layers of paper. Cuts on the white outer layer allow the user to fold parts out and therefore create a “Pixel-Structure” by showing the coloured layer underneath.

Rebloged from takefivejournal

pixel it

A Poster with an alterable Structure

A poster with an alterable structure to display messages - a visually professional and attention grabbing alternative to messy blackboard writings.“Pixel It” consists of two layers of paper. Cuts on the white outer layer allow the user to fold parts out and therefore create a “Pixel-Structure” by showing the coloured layer underneath.

Rebloged from takefivejournal

Comments
3 years ago | 1 note.
Chandigarh for sale
Sell your city’s utilities !

Chandigarh still serves as the capital of Punjab, India. The city was designed as a modernist ‘oeuvre-total’ by Le Corbusier in the 50’s. He conceived everything from the city plan, to the government buildings, the urban equipment, official furniture, logos and identity. Start from scratch, make it functional, and liveable.
In 2010, the city is worth a lot, as a design good, within the plains of Punjab, India, where people still struggle to define their economy.

Le Corbusier’s identity, beyond its true functionality, is being sold for cool-hunters all over the world, from its manholes (21 000$), city lamps (30 000$), and magistrate chairs (up to 30 000 $). Punjab’s people rip their public goods off, and make it worth more then modernist icons.
Chandigarh manhole cover. Auctioned at $ 21,600. June 5, 2007. Rockefeller Plaza, New York. 
Jeanneret chairs at a jail in Chandigarh, after inmates had restored them. Many of the city’s chairs had been thrown out. Taken from the NYTimes. 

- In an article from The Independant: « When Jawaharlal Nehru commissioned the French architect Le Corbusier to build the city Chandigarh he proclaimed it as the embodiment of a newly independent India ‘unfettered by the traditions of the past, a symbol of the nation’s faith in the future’. »
« Amid India’s high-speed transformation into a world power, the purpose-built furniture that once filled the city’s chic public spaces is being systematically sold off in the auction rooms of London, New York and Paris. »

- And in The New York Times: « The process by which the avant-garde furniture left the city’s offices and made its way to New York and Paris reflects a broader ambivalence among the public toward Le Corbusier’s heritage in Chandigarh and widespread official neglect of his work. »
- You can also read here: « City’s dump fetches millions at christies: What, however, is a sad news for the city is that all these were sold at a pittance. Many items had been discarded as waste. According to rough estimates, alt 80 per cent of the furniture and other relics of the time have been sold. Some of the original drawings made by Le Corbusier are also missing from the city. »

Chandigarh for sale

Sell your city’s utilities !

Chandigarh still serves as the capital of Punjab, India. The city was designed as a modernist ‘oeuvre-total’ by Le Corbusier in the 50’s. He conceived everything from the city plan, to the government buildings, the urban equipment, official furniture, logos and identity. Start from scratch, make it functional, and liveable.

In 2010, the city is worth a lot, as a design good, within the plains of Punjab, India, where people still struggle to define their economy.

Le Corbusier’s identity, beyond its true functionality, is being sold for cool-hunters all over the world, from its manholes (21 000$), city lamps (30 000$), and magistrate chairs (up to 30 000 $). Punjab’s people rip their public goods off, and make it worth more then modernist icons.

Chandigarh manhole cover, Le Corbusier, sold for $ 21,600 on June 5, 2007 at an auction in Rockefeller Plaza, New York.
Chandigarh manhole cover.
 
Auctioned at $ 21,600. June 5, 2007.
Rockefeller Plaza, New York. 


Jeanneret chairs at a jail in Chandigarh, after inmates had restored them. Many of the city’s chairs had been thrown out. Taken from the NYTimes

- In an article from The Independant: « When Jawaharlal Nehru commissioned the French architect Le Corbusier to build the city Chandigarh he proclaimed it as the embodiment of a newly independent India ‘unfettered by the traditions of the past, a symbol of the nation’s faith in the future’. »

« Amid India’s high-speed transformation into a world power, the purpose-built furniture that once filled the city’s chic public spaces is being systematically sold off in the auction rooms of London, New York and Paris. »

- And in The New York Times: « The process by which the avant-garde furniture left the city’s offices and made its way to New York and Paris reflects a broader ambivalence among the public toward Le Corbusier’s heritage in Chandigarh and widespread official neglect of his work. »

- You can also read here: « City’s dump fetches millions at christies: What, however, is a sad news for the city is that all these were sold at a pittance. Many items had been discarded as waste. According to rough estimates, alt 80 per cent of the furniture and other relics of the time have been sold. Some of the original drawings made by Le Corbusier are also missing from the city. »

Comments
3 years ago
Andrew B. Myers Photography
Comments
3 years ago

Artist Shuichi Nakano’s “Searching for Paradise" paintings depict Godzilla-sized animals towering over the urban sprawl of Japan.
夢の途中 (In the midst of a dream)
初秋の風、夏の余韻 (Early autumn wind, lingering memory of summer)
5時25分の寒気 (Chill at 5:25)
真昼の記憶 (Memory of noon)
荒天の予感 (Premonition of storm)
帰り道を忘れて (Forgetting the way home)
(Title unknown)
春の園 (Spring garden)
楽園を捜して (Searching for paradise)
source: Pinktentacle

Artist Shuichi Nakano’s “Searching for Paradise" paintings depict Godzilla-sized animals towering over the urban sprawl of Japan.


夢の途中 (In the midst of a dream)


初秋の風、夏の余韻 (Early autumn wind, lingering memory of summer)


5時25分の寒気 (Chill at 5:25)

Painting by Shuichi Nakano --
真昼の記憶 (Memory of noon)

Painting by Shuichi Nakano --
荒天の予感 (Premonition of storm)

Painting by Shuichi Nakano --
帰り道を忘れて (Forgetting the way home)

Painting by Shuichi Nakano --
(Title unknown)

Painting by Shuichi Nakano --
春の園 (Spring garden)

Painting by Shuichi Nakano --
楽園を捜して (Searching for paradise)

source: Pinktentacle

Comments
3 years ago | 2 notes.
You’re all I need … 

You’re all I need … 

(Source: dethjunkie)

Comments
3 years ago | 309 notes.
Partisan Memorials in former Yugoslavia
by Robert Burghardt

The selection here dates from the latter period, which followed the emancipation from the Soviet-Union and the development of Yugoslavia’s own road to socialism along the line of “self-management”. These monuments belong to the most important witnesses of Yugoslav memorial culture and stem from the most active period of Yugoslav modern art which has been described as socialist modernism or socialist aestheticism.
As War-monuments they are unique: They do not express the fighting and death, but life, resistance and the energy by which they were carried. They are directed forward while they mark the starting point for a new society, whose products they are.
Top Photo: Kosmaj, Yougoslavia.

Kozara, Yougoslavia.

Makljen, Yougoslavia.

Sutjeska, Yougoslavia.


Petrova Gora, Yougoslavia.
Voir aussi ici.

Partisan Memorials in former Yugoslavia

by Robert Burghardt


The selection here dates from the latter period, which followed the emancipation from the Soviet-Union and the development of Yugoslavia’s own road to socialism along the line of “self-management”. These monuments belong to the most important witnesses of Yugoslav memorial culture and stem from the most active period of Yugoslav modern art which has been described as socialist modernism or socialist aestheticism.

As War-monuments they are unique: They do not express the fighting and death, but life, resistance and the energy by which they were carried. They are directed forward while they mark the starting point for a new society, whose products they are.

Top Photo: Kosmaj, Yougoslavia.



Kozara, Yougoslavia.



Makljen, Yougoslavia.



Sutjeska, Yougoslavia.



Petrova Gora, Yougoslavia.

Voir aussi ici.

Comments
3 years ago | 6 notes.
Soviet Architecture Photographer Frederic Chaubin travels around some ex-SSRs to capture the essence of what he calls Sci-Fi Architecture.
Words and pictures from here. 

Polytechnic University (Minsk, Belarus, 1981) © Frederic Chaubin
Wedding Palace (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1985) © Frederic Chaubin
“Roads Ministry” (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1975) © Frederic Chaubin
“Soviet Palace” (Kalinigrad, Russia, 1975) © Frederic Chaubin
“Druzhba Holiday Center Hall” (Yalta, Ukraine, 1984)© Frederic Chaubin

Soviet Architecture Photographer Frederic Chaubin travels around some ex-SSRs to capture the essence of what he calls Sci-Fi Architecture.

Words and pictures from here


Polytechnic University (Minsk, Belarus, 1981) © Frederic Chaubin


Wedding Palace (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1985) © Frederic Chaubin


“Roads Ministry” (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1975) © Frederic Chaubin


“Soviet Palace” (Kalinigrad, Russia, 1975) © Frederic Chaubin


“Druzhba Holiday Center Hall” (Yalta, Ukraine, 1984)© Frederic Chaubin

Comments
4 years ago | 3 notes.